Therapy is the term most used in the delivery of psychological services but it is not exclusive to the realm of psychology. Therapy (from the Greek ϑεραπεύω) means to cure, heal, restore (along with many other definitions). So, for example, we have phytotherapy (herbal medicine), occupational therapy (rehabilitation services to regain work or life activities skills), physical therapy (treatment of injuries which interfere with one’s ability to move and function) and so on.

Psychotherapy is the particular form of treatment that targets the psyche (from the Greek ψυχή) and helps us navigate our experiences in the world. There are very many different approaches therapists use in working to ameliorate our psychological problems, as listed here [hot link]: https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/psychotherapy  

In a psychotherapeutic relationship, we work together to understand how both unusual and normal life events may interfere with your wellbeing in an atmosphere of safety and acceptance. The benefits of psychotherapy range from feeling better equipped to navigate through life to becoming less depressed, worried, anxious or angry about your circumstances, as well as learning to better articulate and communicate your needs to your family, partner, children, friends, boss, and co-workers.

Are you thinking of entering psychotherapy?

  • You may be feeling depressed, discouraged, frightened, or anxious.
  • Your depression may be due to difficulties encountered after the birth of a new baby.
  • Your confusion and fear may be due to misunderstandings within your relationship with your lifelong partner. You may even feel a lot of resentment toward each other.
  • You may find it difficult resuming your life after the loss of a loved one.
  • Your anxiety may be a result of worries about how your body looks.
  • You may be frightened about changes occurring in your family, or worried about the problems your children are having as they grow up. You may feel there is too much unexpressed anger in your family.
  • You may feel unappreciated at work, misunderstood by your co-workers or employer.
  • You may have the sense of being at odds with the environment around you because of issues of diversity, sexuality and gender, ethnicity, or acculturation.